Counterculture

Bob Grossman - LINCOLN BABE

Bob Grossman - LINCOLN BABE

Published: 2016-01-12 | Original Article
Attribution Victor Navasky - Buzzfeed

When, in 2005, a book came out saying that Abe Lincoln might be gay, a line and an image popped into the head of Bob Grossman. His <em>Babe Lincoln</em>, which appeared in <em>The Nation</em>, is the result. The letters of protest are still coming in. Gay activists and others object to what they see as Grossman’s assumption that “a man who loves a man really wants to be a woman.” In one of the more polite notes, a former editor of <em>Esquire</em> accused <em>The Nation</em> of publishing “homophobic garbage.” Grossman, who humbly observed, “in the impoverished mental landscape of a cartoonist, this is what passes for true inspiration,” apologized to all he had offended.
When, in 2005, a book came out saying that Abe Lincoln might be gay, a line and an image popped into the head of Bob Grossman. His Babe Lincoln, which appeared in The Nation, is the result. The letters of protest are still coming in. Gay activists and others object to what they see as Grossman’s assumption that “a man who loves a man really wants to be a woman.” In one of the more polite notes, a former editor of Esquire accused The Nation of publishing “homophobic garbage.” Grossman, who humbly observed, “in the impoverished mental landscape of a cartoonist, this is what passes for true inspiration,” apologized to all he had offended.
When, in 2005, a book came out saying that Abe Lincoln might be gay, a line and an image popped into the head of Bob Grossman. His Babe Lincoln, which appeared in The Nation, is the result. The letters of protest are still coming in. Gay activists and others object to what they see as Grossman’s assumption that “a man who loves a man really wants to be a woman.” In one of the more polite notes, a former editor of Esquire accused The Nation of publishing “homophobic garbage.” Grossman, who humbly observed, “in the impoverished mental landscape of a cartoonist, this is what passes for true inspiration,” apologized to all he had offended.
Attribution Victor Navasky - Buzzfeed