Cosmic

Galactic Superwaves - Their Effects on Life and Society

Galactic Superwaves - Their Effects on Life and Society

Published: 2015-12-10 | Original Article
Attribution etheric.com | by Paul LaViolette - The Starburst Foundation

Gama Bubbles
Gama Bubbles
When cosmic rays from Galactic superwaves impact the Earth’s atmosphere, they produce "electron cascades."

Each primary cosmic ray generates millions of secondary high energy electrons. Many of these particles scatter upwards and become trapped by the Earth’s magnetic field to form radiation belts similar to those created by high altitude nuclear explosions.

In just one day, a major Galactic superwave event would inject into the geomagnetic field a particle energy equivalent to 1000 one-megaton hydrogen bomb explosions (1025 ergs). At this rate, the energy delivered to the belts after one year would exceed 30,000 times the energy received from the most powerful solar cosmic ray storms observed in modern times.

Such energized radiation belts could cause a global communications blackout by creating radio static and by permanently damaging critical electronic components of communication satellites. Air travel during such conditions would be extremely hazardous.

The resulting atmospheric ionization would destroy the ozone layer, and increase skin cancer rates, due to high levels of UV reaching the Earth’s surface; the cosmic ray particles penetrating to ground level would significantly increase cell mutation rates.

Galactic superwaves may also produce an intense electromagnetic pulse (EMP) whenever a cosmic ray front happens to strike the Earth’s atmosphere. Galactic superwaves such as those that arrived during the last ice age could have generated pulses delivering tens of thousands of volts per meter in times as short as a billionth of a second, comparable to the early-time EMP signal from a high-altitude nuclear explosion (see Figure 3).

In addition, there is the danger that a superwave could transport outlying cosmic dust into the Solar System which could seriously affect the Earth’s climate possibly triggering a new ice age.

Although there is a small probability that the next superwave will be as catastrophic as the one at the end of the last ice age, even the less intense, more frequent events would be quite hazardous for the global economy.

One principal area of research that the Starburst Foundation is involved with is the investigation of Galactic superwaves, intense cosmic ray particle barrages that travel to us from the center of our Galaxy and that can last for periods of up to several thousand years. Astronomical and geological evidence indicates that the last major superwave impacted our solar system around 12,000 to 16,000 years ago and produced abrupt changes of the Earth’s climate. It is estimated that approximately one or two superwaves strong enough to trigger an ice age are presently on their way to us from their birth place 23,000 light years away. There is a finite chance that one such event could arrive within the next few decades.

Less intense superwaves, which recur with considerable frequency, could also pose a threat. There is evidence that the Galactic Center has erupted as many as ten times in the past two millennia, the most recent event occurring about 700 years ago. While these low intensity events could have passed unnoticed in earlier centuries, today they could be extremely hazardous. The electromagnetic radiation pulse accompanying such a superwave would be far more intense than any gamma ray pulse we have experienced in modern times. It could knock out electrical power grids and communication networks on a global scale and possibly even inadvertently trigger nuclear missile launchings. Consequently, study of this phenomenon deserves a very high priority.

Starburst researcher Dr. Paul LaViolette began alerting the scientific community to the existence of superwaves in 1983 through his published papers and scientific conference presentations (see paper archive). He also raised the public awareness about the superwave phenomenon through his book Earth Under Fire as well as through various magazine articles.

Many aspects of Dr. LaViolette’s superwave theory have since been verified by various observations; see the following list of predictions and their subsequent verification.


Attribution etheric.com | by Paul LaViolette - The Starburst Foundation